Movies you've recently watched

Watched Don't Look Up. Instead of watching this, check out Adam McKay's better doomsday movie, The Big Short.
I'll have to go back to The Big Short, cos I don't remember that one (I know who's in it!). Don't Look Up to me had its moments but I fell asleep mid-way and had to watch it again to finish it. It wasn't bad, but it felt long. It's hard to trust any marketing these days because they like to show the two or big review sites with the highest ratings to push folks to watch it.

I watched The Batman this past weekend and let it sit for a little. And wow, the friends I was with had different take aways from it in terms of what did they like/ not like about it, and hearing those things is always fun. It bothered someone that the movie took place in the night for a majority of the film (which I actually didn't mind), someone said it rained a lot (which I didn't mind), someone thought it was too long (which again, I didn't mind because hey, I come from a country of 3 hour movies being normal anyway!), and so forth. This definitely focused more on Batman being a detective more than kicking ass or about his gadgets turning him into a Superhero James Bond on screen. I can already sense a long review from Griffith detailing all the funny things about Bruce/ Batman's portrayal on this one :griffnotevil:.

I liked the movie. I would recommend checking it out. What I like - action sequences, using the city of Gotham as part of the atmosphere (including all the rain and dark scenes - sure), character focussed and not so much about big action sets/ sequences.
I liked how they twisted the story around Bruce's parents (not as innocent or good as they're portrayed in other movies) and him having an existential crisis when he discovers he's been fighting for the wrong reasons the moment he finds out about the link with Falcone. I didn't think they needed to show the Joker to set it up for a sequel. Batman's core realization of not being vengeance, rather a beacon of hope to the people was a good thing to happen too, without it taking 2 or 3 full movies for him to get it.
Yes - to not having to watch another version of his parents being killed. This pacing was perfect to me - I liked the long pauses and those funny interactions with other cops. Action sequences were a breath of fresh air from the Nolan movies because there isn't a constant camera jump/ cut to a different angle - the sort of action scene gimmick to show a quicker sequence which's so commonly used these days like in the new MK movie. Would I watch it again? Absolutely. Is it the best Batman movie? No, but why compare it? It got me thinking that Robert would've also been a good casting if they were to go the Batman Beyond route. That would've been a good time to see Nic Cage playing older Bruce - who am I kidding?! Hahaha!
 
Yesterday I watched Robert Eggers' The Northman. I was quite hesitant since his previous two films, while being excellent horror films also managed to disturb me which is something I don't really like (horror isn't my cup of tea) yet this one dives a lot less in that territory while still keeping Eggers' filmmaking style.
Overall I found it pretty good from a filmmaking point of view, I'm just glad there are movies of this nature being made in this time and age where only superhero stuff and comedy gets all the money and attention (it was quite terrible hearing fellow audience members commenting and laughing because they couldn't take this kind of tone and film seriously, luckily the theater was quite empty).

I was stunned to see (possibly) some Berserk references, or at least, imagery that comes really really close to it. The context and meaning are totally different, but it was awesome nonetheless. Not actual spoilers, they happen very early on in the film but maybe you'd like to keep the surprise.
- During a ritual to gain his Berserker (in the Vikings meaning), our young protagonist is showing levitating and sheds his last tear while swearing to take revenge on his father in case he gets murdered. That last tear crystalizes and comes back into the story, but the context and meaning is really different than in Berserk, yet it's such a unique concept that I can't not think it's a reference.
- Not even a minute after the aforementioned scene of the last teardrop, there's a visual of a heart with a vortex in the background (instantly recognizeable reference to the Idea of Evil and the vortex of souls), from its veins generate the roots of a tree on which bodies are shown hanging (in the context of the film, it's a visual representation of the family tree and the various generations, but visually it's just the hanging tree where Guts was born).
There are other parallels but they're quite common for this type of stories, those two were the most striking ones to me as a Berserk fan.

Overall I still feel that this film wasn't much of my cup of tea, but it was good to watch. I honestly think that if for some awful reason there will be a Berserk adaptation (more or less faithful) in live action, someone like Robert Eggers would be ideal to have deliver a good film / series, he's really got a great sense of direction and visuals.

Has anyone else watched it?
 
Yesterday I watched Robert Eggers' The Northman. I was quite hesitant since his previous two films, while being excellent horror films also managed to disturb me which is something I don't really like (horror isn't my cup of tea) yet this one dives a lot less in that territory while still keeping Eggers' filmmaking style.
Overall I found it pretty good from a filmmaking point of view, I'm just glad there are movies of this nature being made in this time and age where only superhero stuff and comedy gets all the money and attention (it was quite terrible hearing fellow audience members commenting and laughing because they couldn't take this kind of tone and film seriously, luckily the theater was quite empty).

I was stunned to see (possibly) some Berserk references, or at least, imagery that comes really really close to it. The context and meaning are totally different, but it was awesome nonetheless. Not actual spoilers, they happen very early on in the film but maybe you'd like to keep the surprise.
- During a ritual to gain his Berserker (in the Vikings meaning), our young protagonist is showing levitating and sheds his last tear while swearing to take revenge on his father in case he gets murdered. That last tear crystalizes and comes back into the story, but the context and meaning is really different than in Berserk, yet it's such a unique concept that I can't not think it's a reference.
- Not even a minute after the aforementioned scene of the last teardrop, there's a visual of a heart with a vortex in the background (instantly recognizeable reference to the Idea of Evil and the vortex of souls), from its veins generate the roots of a tree on which bodies are shown hanging (in the context of the film, it's a visual representation of the family tree and the various generations, but visually it's just the hanging tree where Guts was born).
There are other parallels but they're quite common for this type of stories, those two were the most striking ones to me as a Berserk fan.

Overall I still feel that this film wasn't much of my cup of tea, but it was good to watch. I honestly think that if for some awful reason there will be a Berserk adaptation (more or less faithful) in live action, someone like Robert Eggers would be ideal to have deliver a good film / series, he's really got a great sense of direction and visuals.

Has anyone else watched it?
I've also seen the film, i'm not sure if I liked it or not although I'm a big fan of the director's early works, mostly The VVitch. I see your point on some possible Berserk references but it's not likely since The Northman is an adaptation of The Amleth, which is basically Shakespeare's Hamlet. It's a popular story, or you may call it a legend if you think on how old it is. So, Shakespeare kind of got his influence from The Amleth when he wrote Hamlet. The Northman is The Amleth. Still, it must be more fun to watch it as a Berserk fan.

Finally, I would aslo agree, if Berserk had a movie, someone like Eggers may fit perfectly.
 
I didn't know about The Amleth, it would be interesting to see if it contains references to those elements I considered Berserk references (the last teardrop, the heart / tree of generations) since watching the film it seemed to me like direct references.
If it's actually a reference to the original The Amleth, maybe we could find out another element that inspired Miura in drawing Berserk.
 
Berserk references (the last teardrop, the heart / tree of generations) since watching the film it seemed to me like direct references.
Those did not read to me as references, but I respect that you see them that way. For me the connection to Amlet / Hamlet was overwhelming... the whole plot, the characters, the revenge, the witch, and also the pledge. My friends were laughing about all the connections after we left the theater.

A manga I specifically thought of when watching this was Vinland Saga, because
 
Saw a couple movie I recommend:

Black Narcissus (1947) - absolutely loved this movie about nuns going mad in the Himalayas. Find the Critertion print. All backgrounds are painted and feel like an early Walt Disney movie. Gorgeous editing and camera work. It is one of the best films I have ever seen.

I'm Your Man (2021) - simple and nicely made German film about a workaholic who agrees to take part in a study where she will keep a robot boyfriend for three weeks. He has been created as her ideal partner. I enjoyed how this movie explores the idea of a robot companion. It never goes Stepford Wives or slides into Chucky territory, but it does keep a gentleness about it. Dan Stevens does a fantastic job making himself physically into a robot that is constantly learning to blend in as human.
 
Top Gun: Maverick - I liked the old movie, sure, not my favorite Tom Cruise film or a movie I'd watch over and over (like a Commando or Predator or ... wait, wrong actor [!] but you get the message), but this sequel is better. And it's still a very commercial, summer flick without taking itself too seriously. What's not there in it - fast paced action, a good dose of emotion that wasn't lost on me, and call-backs to the first film. You also don't need to watch the first film to watch this sequel because it reminds the audience of the key points of the backstory. The scenes in the plane = awesome. Emotional scenes = rough (in a good way, as in effective - depending on how you see it). Can't wait to watch this at home again, in proper print or 4K.

Also watched the new Doctor Strange film but I'll add thoughts on it later.
 
I want to go see Lightyear with my kid, but I doubt he would stay for more than 30 mins.! Some say it's a terrible movie, though :ganishka:
 
So, did you not see it in a theater?

I did.

My local theater is a small one, and while they have digital projection, (a) sometimes the lighting of the print isn't the best [this's also either theater-specific or with the kind of projection the theater uses or the ticket you opt for in bigger AMC/ Regal theaters], and (b) it's not Dolby.
 
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Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Quickly Diminishing Returns - Boy, aside from Spider-Men (and technically that's a Sony release =), does the MCU sure suck now! So, predicably, after they shot their wad with Endgame, WandaVision was pretty good, but after that though... I thought I'd at least get something out of the Raimi/Elfman combo returning to the genre, but other than some nostalgic aerial shots in New York this was just a dumb mess that didn't even equal the sum of its ultimately disappointing parts (they couldn't get Tom Holland to return the favor from No Way Home and make this thing vital or even relevant somehow? =).

I asked a fellow comics and card collecting friend of mine when Marvel first started putting out the phase 4 media: What's the point anymore? I'm not excited for any of that. The war is over! Thanos is defeated. Marvel won! And it's not going to be the same ever again because this snake is choking on itself. Anyway, interesting case of succeeding to the point of futility.

The age of the Marvel movie began amongst conflict, when Feige was lord of the box office.

He led the War against the blockbuster giants. Faced the Star Wars, alone. And then, there came a moment. When his last worthy film landed. And it was then, as the story is told, that the hue of Lord Feige's eyes faded.
 
Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Quickly Diminishing Returns - Boy, aside from Spider-Men (and technically that's a Sony release =), does the MCU sure suck now!

Funny story, the Doctor Strange sequel was the only recent Marvel thing I had any interest in, but that went down to zero after seeing what a mess the Spider-Man movie was. Now I doubt I'll ever see it, and your post is only confirming that it's the right choice.
 
Ooh, ooh—I know this one! :ganishka:

Heh, I meant what's the point FOR US, because he was asking if I'd watched all the new stuff and I told him I really didn't have much internal motivation. Like, how can we pretend this is still exciting? I was already content with how it all ended, and in many ways it went far beyond my expectations of what they could pull off, basically a 20 movie producing feat never before seen. What more was there to do here? The answer so far: there really is nothing. Uhh... more wacky Thor!? Even that sounds like crap. Basically, do it all again, only worse, or just plain do something worse. That's what it looks like so far.

Funny story, the Doctor Strange sequel was the only recent Marvel thing I had any interest in, but that went down to zero after seeing what a mess the Spider-Man movie was. Now I doubt I'll ever see it, and your post is only confirming that it's the right choice.

Oh man, if you thought the Spider-Endgame was a mess, it's like a fucking perfect masterpiece compared to this shit. This felt like a sloppy extension of one of the streaming shows, and literally half was. The pre-Disney+ Marvel movie machine looks quant by comparison, Old Hollywood!
 
The Northman - Pretty solid film, based on the story of Amleth, which is itself the inspiration for - as you guessed it - Shakespeare's Hamlet. This is the OG story, none of that university student Danish prince 'To be or not to be' stuff. Amleth is one savage mother fucker. Recommended, especially if you like vikings.
 
The Treasure of Abbot Thomas 1974, an adaptation of a ghost story by M.R. James.
A excellent short ghost movie in my mind although I may be a bit biased as I have a great weakness for both fictional and folkloric ghost stories.
 
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Dogville (2003) is a very theatrical film by Lars Von Trier. Strongly recommend that you see Our Town beforehand... specifically this 1989 version with Spalding Gray that is totally awesome; in High School my parents had to put down a $1,500 deposit to rent a rare copy from a video archive. Dogville is filmed entirely on a soundstage and literally looks like a home movie as opposed to a feature film in many moments. The opening of the film bothered me with it's hand cam styling, but I also found myself absorbed and not really noticing in the latter 2/3's because Nicole Kidman does the best performance I've ever seen from her.

It is a movie that brings out conflicting feels and opinions by design. I went into it knowing that this would happen and much good conversation came from it. It is the kind of thing you might continue thinking about and talking about over several days or more. My girlfriend found it interesting, because in the end it is not so different from real life. Note that this is not a feel good movie, but the structure of it makes the subject matter much easier to experience. The rating will be somewhere between R and NC-17, depending on your sensitivity to sexual violence.
 
Last week I watched The Greatest Showman for the first time. I'm not really into musicals (so far my favourite would be La La Land), I did enjoy it a lot. I wish that maybe it was longer, to flesh out the plot and characters more, but it was quite functional as it is. I really loved to see the arc and development of Hugh Jackman's character, his growth and success, then the mistakes and how with the help and support of his friends he was able to go back to the right direction and fix what went wrong.

Yesterday I watched again Mobile Suit Gundam Thunderbolt: December Sky. Even though it's quite short for a film, it really amazes me how intense and effective it is, even after multiple viewings it doesn't lessen the impact of its depiction of war and how it can push people to horrific extremes. Also, the music and especially the animation quality is top tier, I can't get enough of that. I hope they'll announce a continuation soon, even though chances are very minimal at this point.
 
Some recent watches on my end: The Gray Man, Into the Night, Annihilation, Klute, Hard Boiled, and The Killer (1989). Varying degrees of good and bad. :ganishka:
 
Day Shift (2022) - 6/10
A light hearted buddy movie about vampire hunters in California which serves its purpose as mindless entertainment to be watched then forgotten about.
 
The Last Duel - Went in blind and expecting it to be typical Hollywood trash...It turned out to be not only a good movie, but based on a true story that took place in Late Medieval France. I was surprised at how invested I was in the story and the ending. The politics and weird "scientific" beliefs they had back then played a part in the story, and made for some frustrating scenes!

I'll say that they weren't exactly subtle when incorporating today's issues and politics into the film. It took me out of the experience at times, but otherwise it was a really enjoyable movie. Recommended.
 
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Yesterday I went to see the Avatar (2009) re-release in theaters and it was a massively satisfying experience. I had already watched the film at home years ago and beside the technical qualities I didn't think much about it (especially for the writing). Some time had passed since my previous viewing, so experiencing it in theaters felt like watching it for the first time and I've got to admit, it really makes a massive difference. It's easy to complain about the story or characters, but I'd say that albeit being simple and somewhat predictable, it's really solidly conceived and executed. The effort on creating a whole culture, language, customs for the Na'vi and this fashinating bond of every living form with nature is palpable and I have to praise Cameron for his work in this department. Then, there's the whole aspect of creating 80% of the film in CGI and motion capture and it really blows my mind by how realistic and exceptional it is still to this day despite being a 13 years old film.
Now I'm all the more excited for this December's Avatar: The Way of Water and the sequels to come. It just feels so good to experience the work of a phenomenal storyteller and visionary filmmaker at the top of his craft.

Speaking of other films I enjoyed recently, there's also Bullet Train by David Leitch with Brad Pitt. It was incredibly hilarious to watch, I don't remember laughing out loud so much in a theater in my whole life. The action was also really great.
 
Now I'm all the more excited for this December's Avatar: The Way of Water and the sequels to come. It just feels so good to experience the work of a phenomenal storyteller and visionary filmmaker at the top of his craft.

1984 - 1991 was James Cameron at the top of his craft. Hell, I'll include up to 1997 because Titanic was an filmmaking achievement. But Avatar!? I was unimpressed even then and I can't imagine that it has aged well. No interest whatsoever in the new one (I don't mean to detract from your own excitement though). One thing I'm curious about is how well it'll do at the box office. I wonder if the old "super fans" will answer the call, basically.
 
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